E-I-E-I-O!

I created a sound memory game on the farm. Literally.

When:
NOVEMBER 2018 - DECEMBER 2018
What:
UNITY 3D, CHUCK, C#/C++

Background:

I created a computer game, E-I-E-I-O!, for children to learn and memorize animal onomatopoeias and help players of all ages with their short term memory with regards to sound and pitch. Players are given a sound clip, generated in real-time via ChucK, that plays a sequence of animal noises. They are also given a farm scene with specific animals. The animal noises of the farm scene are adjusted based on the state of the animal, which is toggled through keyboard and mouse-based commands.  The player’s objective is to toggle the farm scene to the matching state based on the sound clip.



Process:

I wanted to create something that was whimsical and playful but educational. This led to a range of ideas from pure silliness (nonsense noises!) and nursery rhymes, which then led me to explore onomatopoeias. However, in designing a more nuanced version for non-children to broaden my audience, I added different modes beyond just matching an animal with its correct sound. I created a difficult mode which would test a player's short term audio memory as well as give them more room for creativity to modify the animal noises to their own device without consequence.

Using C# and ChucK (a sound-synthesis programming language), I coded the entire game in Unity. I used ChucK to modify the intensity, pitch, and volume of different animal sounds.

The animals can either be:
  • sleeping (no sound)
  • sitting (low intensity sounds)
  • walking (medium intensity sounds)
  • running (medium-high intensity sounds)
  • jumping (high intensity sounds)
Animal states are toggled by clicking directly on the animal. Once a state is toggled, the animal will produce their respective onomatopoeia that corresponds with their state. For example, a jumping horse will produce very high-intensity neighing.

The objective is to match the sounds of the farm scene to the sound clip, which is randomly generated. The Easy Mode only selects one animal to produce a sound, whereas the Difficult Mode can select any number of animals in the scene.

Currently, the animals are not in the correct state (see the status in the top-left corner!).
The animals are now correctly matched (note the change in status).
Finally, players are given the option of shifting the pitch and volume. Pressing the up and down arrows will increase and decrease the volume. The animals’ size will correspond to the volume; for example, larger animals will produce louder sounds.

As you can tell by the large size of the animals, the volume of the animal sounds is really high!

For the pitch, the player can press any number key from 0-4, with 0 being the lowest pitch and 4 being the highest. The pitches are separated by an octave.

Final Product:

A demo of my program (which was presented in the Artful Design Fall 2018 final showcase at Stanford) can be found here:



CREdITS: UNITY ASSETS fROM SURIYUN, IOAN STAN, MARIO HABERLE. SOUND ASSETS FROM SOUNDBIBLE.